The reasons Africa is Lagging behind in the Space Race

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The 21st century has been labeled the ‘Space Age’ for good reason. A new generation of private spaceflight companies, like Blue Origin and SpaceX, have made tremendous advancements in affordable and reliable access to low-Earth orbit in recent years. Meanwhile, larger companies like Boeing and Airbus have partnered with smaller firms like Vector to enter the commercial space launch market. With all of these developments, it would seem as though Africa should be a natural leader in this field. After all, much of the developing world lacks basic infrastructure such as clean water or electricity, making solutions that don’t require a constant power supply an attractive proposition. Furthermore, with many countries still recovering from the effects of colonialism and ongoing issues related to corruption and disease pandemics, there is ample incentive to accelerate a self-sustaining solution that doesn’t rely on outside help.

 

Africa is lagging in space race

Looking back at the history of spaceflight, there are a few early leaders who were ahead of their time in the number of launches, technologies, and profit margins. These were entities that became household names, like the early American rocket team Mercury and the Soviet Union’s Soviet Cosmodrome, designed to launch humans into orbit. However, in the post-Cold War landscape of competitive spaceflight, these companies have largely been left behind. So where is Africa in all of this? There are a few main areas Africa falls short of vocationally: technology, access to resources, and even business models. The first being that Africa lags behind in many ways. The second being that there is still a great deal of uncertainty and uncertainty around the future of human spaceflight, which is largely the product of a low-information, low-contehibit state of mind.

 

Africa must step up its game

To be sure that Africa’s place in the space race is rooted in merit, it’s critical that it steps up its game. What’s more, it must also work to ensure that it doesn’t become a pariah for its own backwardness. This means creating a public-private partnership model, based on collaboration and sharing, for the launch industry. This model would allow African companies to access international markets, while maintaining their independence and doing so at the same time. This model would also allow African firms to access international markets, while maintaining their independence and doing so at the same time. It must be flexible enough to address demands from both the private and public sectors, and incorporate elements that further strengthen African startups. It must also be attractive to international investors. A flexible model would allow African firms to access international markets, while maintaining their independence and doing so at the same time. It must be flexible enough to address demands from both the private and public sectors, and incorporate elements that further strengthen African startups. It must be attractive to international investors.

 

Africa lacks technology on hand

One of the main reasons Africa lags behind in the space race is due to a lack of technology on hand. This, in turn, has many companies on the ground losing money, rather than profitably investing in technologies that would make the continent’s leap to commercial service possible. This, in turn, creates an environment where companies can see an opportunity to grow and make a real impact forward. To address this, African companies must have the skills and know-how to design, build, and maintain the equipment needed for launch. They must also have the know-how to operate and manage the equipment, as well as the knowledge of how to make the launch a success. This requires a combination of business connections and industry expertise, as well as access to new technologies that would make the leap to commercial service possible.

 

African countries still lack affordable and reliable power

Another major cause of Africa’s lagging space race is due to a lack of affordable and reliable power. This, in turn, has led to a generation of companies with little experience operating in low-Earth orbit facing a major threat. The best-case scenario would be for the African countries to adopt a market-based electricity pricing system, where electricity is paid for on a per-kilómetre basis. However, this is highly problematic due to political reasons. In order to avoid a power crisis, which has led to Black Power-style protests and wildcat strikes in some parts of the continent, it’s critical that countries like Tunisia, Egypt, and Morocco adopt market-based electricity pricing systems. To encourage growth and innovation, these pricing systems could also be used to reduce taxes on energy use, as well as promote greater social justice.

 

Africa’s Stagnation in Launch Technology

Launching companies in space requires significant upfront investment. This, in turn, comes with numerous upfront and operational costs that accumulate over time. Costs related to equipment, training, and ongoing operational maintenance can exceed $100 million per year. As a result, companies often races to the finish to make room for paying back the money raised from investments or conducting business as usual. This, in turn, drives down the profitability of the company. To address this, some African companies have begun to explore the use of carbon fiber as the frame and structure of their rockets. This, in turn, has led to an increase in the use of carbon fiber as a design guideline, which has led to lower costs and improved performance. However, progress on this front has been slow, as most companies are still working with basic materials like wood and fabric.

 

How do we make space travel affordable for everyone?

A cheaper, more efficient, and more accessible method of getting around the world has been one of the most discussed Africa-focused topics of the year. The $100 flight to space should be available to all, via affordable airlines, hotels, and airports. There are a few main benefits of this approach to space travel—most notably the elimination of the need for expensive tourist attractions, as well as the protection of the environment and human health in the process. Another advantage is that the routes taken by this route will be easier to follow, as well as less crowded. These advantages should give everyone in the region a fighting chance to succeed in space. To implement this, African and international partners should work to reduce the number of aircraft and passengers on the market, to reduce the costs of operations, and to create more accessible and reliable networks of reliable and affordable airlines.

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